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Amazing new typeface allows dyslexics to read

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
September 2nd, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Dyslexia is a condition that mixes up letters, and renders those who are afflicted with the condition - the dyslexic, effectively illiterate. Many dyslexics can read, but only after great difficulty. Now, a new font called "Dyslexie" is helping dyslexics to read.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Dyslexie varies the size and shape of each letter to make sure all words are recognizable. Key to the font's success is a heavy baseline, making the bottom of each letter thicker, makes it less likely for a reader to misread the word.

The font was developed by Dutch graphic designer Christian Boer to address the difficulties dyslexics face when reading digital fonts.
 
Boer claims that traditional fonts are designed purely from an aesthetic point of view. They look good, but make words and sentences harder to read.

A study by researchers at the University of Twente in the Netherlands found that Dyslexie reduced the likelihood of reading errors for dyslexics.

The Dyslexie font has been made so that every letter is unique. Each and every letter has varying tail-lengths, larger-than-normal openings, and semi-italics, making them more recognizable.

Characters such as b, d and u, which can look similar, have been adapted by changing the tails, to reduce the similarity and avoid the problem of mirror images and rotation.

However, "reading with the font Dyslexie doesn't lead to an increase in reading speed," study author Renske de Leeuw said. "There was, however a decrease in the reading errors when dyslexics read words that where printed in the font Dyslexie."

Designer Abelardo Gonzalez has created his own free open-source font, which he has based on Dyslexie. Like Dyslexie, the font has a heavier bottom to give letters "gravity," making it less likely the brain will rotate them and confuse sufferers.

The fonts are now available for mobile phones. The font's creator hopes it will become commonplace online. The font is being available for free online in a bid to boost its use.

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