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Legendary broadcaster Sir David Frost dies at 74

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
September 2nd, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

David Frost - formally know as Sir David Frost was a legendary journalist and broadcaster, whose career spanned journalism, comedy writing and daytime television presenting is perhaps best known for his series of revealing interviews with former U.S. President Richard Nixon following the Watergate scandal. Frost has died at the age of 74 following a heart attack he suffered while onboard a cruise ship.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Frost was aboard the Queen Elizabeth Saturday night where he was set to give a speech. "His family is devastated and asks for privacy at this difficult time. A family funeral will be held in the near future and details of a memorial service will be announced in due course."

\"David loved broadcasting, did it brilliantly for more than 50 years and was eagerly looking forward to a host of projects - including interviewing the prime minister next week - before his sudden and tragic death," Barney Jones, who edited "Breakfast with Frost" program on the BBC for more than 10 years said. "We will all miss him enormously."

\"Sir David was an extraordinary man, with charm, wit, talent, intelligence and warmth in equal measure," British Prime Minister David Cameron said.

Born in Kent, Frost studied at Cambridge University where he became secretary of the Footlights club, and met future comedy greats such as Peter Cook, Graham Chapman and John Bird.
After university he went to work at ITV before he was asked to front the BBC program "That Was The Week That Was," which ran between 1962 and 1963.

"The Frost Report" brought together John Cleese, Ronnie Barker and Ronnie Corbett in a sketch show which would influence many comedy writers including the "Monty Python" crew.

Sir David began work on "The David Frost Show" in the United States. He later conducted a series of interviews with Nixon, who had resigned the presidency two years earlier, in which the former president came close to apologizing to the public for his role in the Watergate scandal.

Their exchanges were made into the film "Frost/Nixon," which saw Michael Sheen portray Sir David Frost to Frank Langella\'s Nixon. Sir David himself appeared at the premiere of the film in 2008.

\"He was a legendary broadcasting figure and a member of the British broadcasting landscape for two generations and in many ways his success was very un-English," Playwright Peter Morgan said.

\"He was a pioneer. He combined being a satirist and someone who one satirized. It was an extraordinary, four-dimensional, vivid career...and he was a great lunch.\"

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