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Illegal immigration falls to low, but drugs still flow freely

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
August 22nd, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

As Congress prepares to pass an immigration reform bill that could double the number of border patrol agents, residents tell journalists they feel like they are living in a militarized zone. Meanwhile the apprehension illegal immigrants has reached its lowest point since 1979.

NOGALES, AZ (Catholic Online) - Helicopters routinely buzz overhead and border agents are a more common sight than police in the town of Nogales, Arizona. High above, unseen, a drone sometimes patrols the skies above the border which U.S. officials are trying ever harder to secure.

Residents in the region repeatedly say they feel like they are living in a "militarized zone" or something akin. However, they also add that the agents, who are typically their neighbors, are normally very polite and make good citizens.

Their increased vigilance is paying off, at least in one way. Illegal immigration is down, perhaps to its lowest level since 1979. New technology, more staff and better training have all delivered better results. Those looking to enter the country illegally from Mexico are finding the task increasingly difficult.

Add the weak state of the U.S. economy, and the fact there are few jobs, even for illegal immigrants, and the factors combine to suppress immigration both legal and illegal.

Still, they try. Many now attempt to enter the country by riskier means, contracting with smugglers known as "coyotes" who will escort them across the border, for a fee. Such trips are dangerous and often involve trekking through the desert heat with very little water or relief.

Once these immigrants arrive in the States, they risk being sold into human trafficking rings and slavery. Added to that risk is the possibility of apprehension and deportation from U.S. authorities.

For many in countries outside the U.S., the risk isn't worth the effort or cost.

Curiously, while the apprehension of illegal immigrants is down, mostly because of more effective policing methods and fewer people trying, the importation of illegal drugs from Mexico seems to continue unabated. The flow of money and weapons south, also appears unabated.

Catholic Online has previously reported via inside sources that the CIA, and the U.S. government are complicit in at least a fraction of this illicit trade, which would provide some explanation. Handpicked agents are planted and positioned to facilitate these exchanges.

It's a troubling thought, but not one that is beyond belief.

Residents of many border towns dislike the heavy presence of the border patrol in their communities. Complaints include a decline in tourism and a general feeling that individual rights could be violated without provocation or cause.

Border patrol agents have also fired on people, especially youth, who have not cooperated with demands made by agents. Residents say the agency is developing a sense of self-importance and omnipotence, which is unwarranted.

Indeed, the idea that the law is itself above the law, is anathema to Americans, but it is also the natural consequence of a lack of oversight, generous funding, and pervasive support which includes fellow agents, weapons and drones.

It also comes as the agency gets better at its job. There's a certain amount of bravado that comes with success, and the agency has been successful, at least when it comes to stemming the tide of illegal immigration.

Now, as the economy picks up pace in the U.S., it is believed that incentives for foreigners to enter the country illegally will increase. Ass that happens, the border patrol will need to increase its presence in communities which already feel plagued by the agency.

That will mean more guards, more vehicles, more drones, and less privacy.

For those who live along the border, the situation s slated to worsen, not improve, especially as the government continues to pursue questionable policies across the region.

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