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Behold - FRANKENBURGER! Lab-grown burger to be unveiled, eaten at press conference

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
August 5th, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Whereas Dr. Frankenstein in movies of old tried to recreate a live human being in his Gothic laboratory, modern-day scientists are doing the next big thing - they artificially growing a hamburger in an attempt to keep apace with the world's growing demand for meat. The "Franken-burger" will be unveiled and eaten at a press conference.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Scientists taking cells from a cow and then transformed them into strips of muscle at an institute in the Netherlands and turned them into a patty.

Satisfying the world's growing demand for meat and replacing them with artificial byproducts, experts say would be an easier way to tackle predicted food shortages.

The meat was grown in a project costing 215,000.

"Later today we are going to present the world's first hamburger made in a lab from cells. We are doing that because livestock production is not good for the environment, it is not going to meet demand for the world and it is not good for animals," Professor Mark Post of Maastricht University, the scientist behind the burger, says.

In dissension, Professor Tara Garnett, head of the Food Policy Research Network at Oxford University, says that decision-makers needed to look beyond technological solutions.

"We have a situation where 1.4 billion people in the world are overweight and obese, and at the same time one billion people worldwide go to bed hungry," she warns.

"That's just weird and unacceptable. The solutions don't just lie with producing more food but changing the systems of supply and access and affordability so not just more food but better food gets to the people who need it."

In contrasting the environmental impact of conventional and laboratory beef production, an independent study found that lab grown beef uses 45 percent less energy than the average global representative figure for farming cattle.

Artificially produced meat also produces 96 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions and requires 99 percent less land.

Most institutes working in this area are trying to grow human tissue for transplantation, to replace worn out or diseased muscle, nerve cells or cartilage.

Professor Post says he wants to use similar techniques to grow muscle and fat for food.

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