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40 years after first alleged gay marriage, the truly married become the resistance

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
July 8th, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Americans are aghast at the wave of gay marriages that are taking place across the country. Betrayed by activist courts who were swayed by special interests, people with same-sex attractions have been marrying in states where it is permitted, shocking the rest of the world. However, only those with long memories may recall the first gay marriage performed in the U.S. in 1973.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - More than 40 years ago, the first 'gay marriage' was performed in Minnesota, complete with license and minister. At that time, marriage was protected by law and the marriage license application for Jack Baker and Michael McConnell, was rejected.

Baker told the David Susskind Show, broadcast on radio, "It goes to the core of discrimination, you cannot let non-gay people treat you differently. you have to say I pay taxes to support this government and it is going to recognize me as an equal citizen or by God I'm going to disrupt that government."

The men decided to cheat the system, with Baker changing his name to "Pat Lyn."

The difference was enough - the gender-neutral name tricked officials into approving the license. It was obtained by fraud.

Document in hand, the men found a minister to marry them in the Methodist Church and went through pre-marriage counseling together. At the last minute however, the minister they chose had an attack of conscience and backed out. A replacement was found and the men underwent a marriage ceremony. They were pronounced "husband and husband" and their cake was topped with two grooms.

The couple remains married since their license was never revoked. However, it was obtained by fraud and could be set aside. They no longer give interviews.

The minister who married them lost his job, but was later reinstated.

Following this event, gays attempted to marry but were systematically stopped and turned away. This did not prevent gays from engaging in their own ceremonies, even if they were barred from legal recognition. Gays have entered into such bonds for decades in private, pagan and secular ceremonies despite the lack of public recognition as a marriage or approval.

However, it's worth nothing that there is a difference between the sacrament of marriage as recognized by the Church and marriages claimed by others, even if it includes the state. No matter what any secular authority says, or what label society gives to homosexual unions or any other relationships, marriage remains as it was. It precedes realigion and government. It is defined by both God and the Natural Moral Law.

In the Catholic and Orthodox Church, it is a Sacrament, a means to holiness, a source of grace, and a reflection of Christ's love for His Church, who is referred to as His Bride in the Christian Scriptures.

Marriage can only take place between one man and one woman.

Although the current legal construct undermines the moral fabric of our society, and will continue to do so, the integrity of true marriage will remain. This is not a time to give up the fight, but rather to redouble efforts.

If possible, we can patch the damage done by restoring the legal definition of marriage to what it has always been since it was created by God in the Garden, however the individual locus of control remains powerfully between couples who have been truly married before God and the Church.

To protect marriage, heterosexual couples should endeavor to remain faithful, eschew divorce, and keep their marriage focused on God and His Church. For the erosion of marriage did not begin with last month's Supreme Court ruling. Rather, it began when we permitted divorce at will, when we embraced a culture of promiscuity as normal, and we stopped attending our churches and listening to God.

The Churches and lawyers will keep up the good fight to defend the institution of marriage, but now is the time to become the resistance. We resist most powerfully when our marriages remain steadfast and true, grounded firmly in Christ.

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