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Leaders of Egyptian army are adamant no coup was staged. Here is the list of key players.

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
July 4th, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

The Egyptian military is adamant that the ouster of the country's first democratically elected leader was not the result of a coup. In either case, the Egyptian army has been a powerful force in Egypt since the 1952 coup, bringing forth presidents such as Abdel Nasr and Hosni Mubarak. Removing Mubarak in 2011, the controlled government until President Mohamed Morsi was elected. The military now holds the reins following his forced removal on Wednesday.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Fattah al-Sisi was appointed by Morsi as the general commander of Egypt's armed forces and defense minister. Instrumental in the army's decision on July 3, after two days of warnings - al-Sisi dissolved the country's constitution and parliament and call for new elections.

The army had previously given details of a "roadmap" on what it would do in the aftermath of overthrowing Morsi. The army has declared that political power will be handed back to them as soon as a new president is elected and a new constitution is agreed.

In the meantime, the Muslim Brotherhood, the oldest and largest Islamist organization in Egypt, has lost credence with the Egyptian people. The group's political wing, the Freedom and Justice Party, backed Mohamed Morsi in the 2012 elections. With Morsi out, there is widespread public anger at the Brotherhood's agenda.

The conservative F&J Party gained the most seats in the 2012 parliamentary elections, and Morsi won office with 51 percent of the presidential vote. But it remains to be seen how the party and any new presidential candidate will fare in the forthcoming elections, such has been public anger at its policies and record over the last year.

The "Tamaroud" party, Tamaroud meaning rebellion in Arabic, was the driving force behind the protests that led to the end of Morsi's presidency. The group connected with youth discontent with Egyptian politics, gaining support through social media campaigns and more traditional street canvassing.

The group claims it gathered 22 million signatures in a petition demanding Morsi to step down. Among other things, the petition blamed Morsi for: rising crime, the poor state of Egypt's economy, and the growing influence of the United States in Egyptian affairs.
 
The Al-Nour party, the second-largest Islamist party, was created after the 2011 revolution. It supports Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood but has pushed for the implementation of Sharia law.

The National Salvation Front, also known as the National Front for Salvation of the Revolution or the National Rescue Front, is an alliance of political parties and the largest opposition bloc.

Al-Azhar, is the highest Sunni Islamic authority in Cairo and is led by Grand Imam Ahmed El-Tayyeb. Al-Azhar has claimed to have been marginalized since the Muslim Brotherhood came to power.

Egypt's Coptic Orthodox Church has praised mass protests against Morsi, saying it was "wonderful to see the Egyptian people taking back their stolen revolution in a peaceful way."

The Coptic pope and is the leader of Egypt's estimated four million to eight million Christian minority, which had complained of being targeted by Muslim Brotherhood sympathizers during Morsi's period in office.

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