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COUP IN EGYPT: Morsi regime toppled in Egypt . What now?

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
July 4th, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

The Egyptian military has made good on its threat and has swept President Mohamed Morsi - elected over a year ago, from power. Egypt's first democratically elected leader was ousted after days of mass demonstrations. The event marked the country's second revolution in two years.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Morsi's brief time in power was met with worldwide dismay and disappointment. A Western-educated Islamist aligned with the Muslim Brotherhood movement, Morsi had rejected an ultimatum delivered by the military to resolve the crisis within 48 hours.

Morsi "did not achieve the goals of the people" during his single year in office, General Abdel-Fatah El-Sisi said on nationwide television.

El-Sisi says that Adly Mansour, head of the country's Supreme Constitutional Court, will replace Morsi as Egypt's interim president and is expected to be sworn in shortly. The road map announced by El-Sisi also includes suspending and rewriting the constitution introduced after former Dictator Hosni Mubarak's ouster, and holding new parliamentary and presidential elections at a later, unspecified date.

Mansour, a 67-year-old judge only became the head of Egypt's Supreme Constitutional Court this week. He has been named as the country's new interim president just two days later. He was appointed vice president of the court in 1992, serving during Mubarak's nearly 30-year rule. It's said that Mansour could serve between 9 to 12 months in an interim role.
While the news has been welcomed amid revelers, there are many Egyptians who fear what may now come next. Recent protests focused on Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood party's Islamic agenda being brought to bear on the nation's laws, to frustration with his government's failure to address high unemployment, crime and living costs.

Elected as president with 52 percent of the vote last year, Morsi retains a substantial support base, which has congregated at rallies in places like Nasr City in Cairo. Morsi proponents have decried the army's move as an illegitimate coup and refused to accept its validity. Morsi himself has declared that he is still president.

As news of the coup broke, clashes were reported throughout the country, with at least eight killed and 340 wounded. Political violence had rocked the country in the days leading up to the military takeover.

Morsi has been arrested by presidential guards at their headquarters, and is being held under house arrest and "basically cut (off) from the world," Muslim Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad told CNN. "They cut all his access, all his calls. No one is meeting him," he said.

U.S. President Barack Obama has expressed America's "deep concern" over the toppling of a democratically elected leader and the suspension of the constitution, and said he would instruct officials to review aid contributions to Egypt as a result.

However, as analysts have pointed out, Obama's statement was telling in that he did not use the word "coup," and in that he called on the Egyptian military to restore power to "a democratically elected civilian government" -- but not explicitly Morsi's. The world community at large had expressed deep disappointment after Morsi granted himself sweeping powers midway through his presidency.

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