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If you don't stop it -- you'll go blind! Sick sexual fetish can be dangerous, doctors warn

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
June 16th, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

There is nothing new under the sun, they say . The world has been given fair warning that eyeball-licking fetishism, also known as "oculolinctus" or "worming" is a very dangerous practice. This rather distasteful practice has become a popular way of expressing affection or inciting sexual arousal in Japan. Doctors warn that it is linked to a serious risk of virus conjunctivitis, other eye infections, and even blindness.

LOS ANGELES, Ca (Catholic Online) - According to the Japanese website Naver Matome, the oculolinctus craze has resulted in a significant increase in eye-infection cases.

The practice came to light when a Japanese school noticed that children were coming into class wearing eye patches. One third of all the twelve-year-old children at the school had engaged in oculolinctus.

The fad was apparently borne out of a music video by the Japanese emo band "Born."

It goes without saying that when the tongue makes contact with the eye, it is exposed to all kinds of infections and eye damage.

David Granet, M.D., an ophthalmologist said "Nothing good can come of this. There are ridges on the tongue that can cause a corneal abrasion. And if a person hasn't washed out their mouth, they might put acid from citrus products or spices into the eye," Granet told the Huffington Post.

There is also the serious risk of passing on viruses. If somebody who does the licking has herpes and a cold sore, there is a risk of human transmission via oculolinctus.

"The bacteria in the mouth are nothing like the bacteria in the eyeball, which is why we no longer recommend people lick contact lenses to moisten them," Dr. Phillip Rizzuto, a spokesman for the American Academy of Ophthalmology told the International Science Times. He also warned that there is a risk of eventual blindness.
 
If the person doing the licking suffers from bad breath, they are likely to have a huge number of harmful bacteria. The eyeball, which has an absorbing membrane, makes infection highly likely.

Animals use their tongues for personal hygiene. While humans do the same thing, the tongue and mouth are designed to deal with a much wider variety of pathogens than our eyeballs are.

Who knows what would be passed on to somebody's eye when the licker had just licked his/her hands, especially if that hand has not been washed in a while.

Bottom line? Don't do it!

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