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Poor Neanderthals! Study Claims they just couldn't adapt

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
June 3rd, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

The heavy-browed Neanderthals lost to Homo sapiens in the battle to survive as they were not clever enough to adapt. That's the conclusions of a five-year study that aims to show that modern man walked the planet much earlier than was believed -- and Neanderthals died out much sooner than was estimated.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic online) - The study says that the brains of Neanderthals were the same size as those of modern man but more of it was used to focus on the physical needs of their larger bodies. In contrast, the modern humans from Africa evolved the part of their brains responsible for thinking, which they used to connect with other groups in times of need.

With the arrival of the Ice Age, modern man could speak a complex language and set up operations far from their homes, unlike Neanderthals.

Europe was at one time dominated by Neanderthals. These human forerunners disappeared after modern man was thought to have emerged 60,000 years ago.

According to the research program Reset, which stands for Response of Humans to abrupt environmental transitions, Homo sapiens could have arrived 45,000 years ago.

Scientists using radiocarbon dating discovered there appeared to be no Neanderthal sites 39,000 years ago, 10,000 years earlier than previous thought.

Homo sapiens could have arrived 45,000 years ago. Five thousand years later, Neanderthals had all but vanished.

The results of the research will be unveiled at a three-day conference titled "When Europe was covered by Ice and Ash," at the British Museum in London.

When the Neanderthals went extinct is disputed. Fossils found in the Vindija Cave in Croatia have been dated to between 33,000 and 32,000 years old, and Neanderthal artifacts from Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar are believed to be less than 30,000 years ago, but a recent study has re-dated fossils at two Spanish sites as 45,000 years old, 10,000 years older than previously thought, and may cast doubt on recent dates at other sites. Cro-Magnon (early-modern-human) skeletal remains showing certain "Neanderthal traits" have been found in Lagar Velho (Portugal) and dated to 24,500 years ago, suggesting that there may have been an extensive admixture of the Cro-Magnon and Neanderthal populations in that region.

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