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Diabetics since childhood are 50 percent more likely to suffer heart attack

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
January 2nd, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

According to new study conducted in the United Kingdom, those who have suffered from diabetes since childhood, or Type 1 diabetes are 50 percent more likely to suffer a heart attack. The study was just the first to examine complications resulting from both Type 1 and 2 versions of the disease.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic online) - Other complications resulting from diabetes include heart failure, angina and stroke and the necessity of amputations. The major surprise yielded in the study, this not only includes those who suffer from Type 2 diabetes, which is usually associated with weight and lifestyle, but Type 1 diabetes that is usually acquired during childhood.

A National Diabetes Audit which analyzed the care of two million people with diabetes in 2010/11 in England and Wales. The report concluded that 14,476 of those included in the audit had a heart attack during 2010/11, which are 4,694 more than expected.

In 2010/11 - 45,000 people with diabetes suffered heart failure - 17,700, or 65 percent, which was more than the number expected -- 27,300.

Overall, diabetics are at a 40 percent higher risk of death than the general population, with 65,700 diabetics dying in 2011, when only 47,000 such deaths were expected.

Women with diabetes were at a greater relative risk of death than men with diabetes: at 142 percent for Type 1 and 40 per cent for Type 2 for women, compared to 130 per cent and 33 per cent respectively for men.

Health experts say that the health poll is just the "tip of the iceberg" as the audit does not include 10 percent of people with the condition and those living elsewhere in the U.K.

"It is a tragedy that a large proportion of these thousands of extra heart attacks could have been prevented simply through better education, treatment and care," Chief executive of Diabetes UK Barbara Young says.

"We hope this report spurs the NHS into action to improve the current situation where fewer than half of people with diabetes meet the recommended cholesterol levels and a significant minority is not even having it measured."

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt says that "people with diabetes should be able to expect excellent care from the NHS and they will get it more consistently in future.

"I know there has been progress, but there is still unacceptable variation and we are determined to put that right."

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