Article brought to you by: Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Some 7,500 people unwittingly sell their souls for computer game

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
December 3rd, 2012
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Remember that song that goes, "I owe my soul to the company store?" Well, thanks to some cleverly written terms and conditions, a British computer game retailer now legally owns the souls of some 7,500 shoppers.

LONDON, ENGLAND (Catholic Online) - Game Station, a British computer game retailer, temporarily added a clause to their contract that allows them to collect on the immortal soul of any individual doing business with the company.

The clause reads, "By placing an order via this Web site on the first day of the fourth month of the year 2010 Anno Domini, you agree to grant us a non transferable option to claim, for now and for ever more, your immortal soul. Should We wish to exercise this option, you agree to surrender your immortal soul, and any claim you may have on it, within 5 (five) working days of receiving written notification from gamesation.co.uk or one of its duly authorised minions."

It continues, "we reserve the right to serve such notice in 6 (six) foot high letters of fire, however we can accept no liability for any loss or damage caused by such an act. If you a) do not believe you have an immortal soul, b) have already given it to another party, or c) do not wish to grant Us such a license, please click the link below to nullify this sub-clause and proceed with your transaction."

Few people clicked the box to opt out of the clause.

Those who opted out of the clause got a reward too, a 5 voucher.

The clause was added for April Fool's day and was intended as a prank. However, it also demonstrated something very educational about terms and conditions agreements - most people do not read them. According to Game Station, 88 percent of those presented with the clause simply clicked through without reading it.

Game Station says they will not enforce their ownership rights, and would in fact be circulating an email nullifying them.

However, the lesson is plain. The devil is in the details, so it pays to read what you're signing.

Article brought to you by: Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)