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What is this roller coaster doing in the ocean?

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
November 6th, 2012
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Nothing lasts forever, not even the magic of the Jersey shore. This week, residents are still puzzling over what will happen to their beloved boardwalks and carnivals which have been utterly destroyed, some pushed into the sea. 

ATLANTIC CITY, NJ (Catholic Online) - Millions of New Jersey residents who live along the Atlantic coast are in anguish as their beloved local icons have been destroyed. For many, childhood memories washed out to sea last week as Superstorm Sandy ravaged the coast. 

Along the full 127-mile extent of the shore, million-dollar homes have been destroyed alongside blue-collar bungalows. 

Near Seaside Heights, a popular roller coaster sits in the ocean, after the storm destroyed its pier. The surreal sight is becoming a popular icon for the havoc Sandy caused throughout the state. 

Even governor Chris Christie remarked on the coaster, asking, "Who ever thought they'd see a roller coaster in Seaside Heights in the ocean?"

Many realize the Jersey shore will never be the same. Too much destruction has been wrought, and there's simply not enough resources to restore everything. 

Climate-change proponents predict storms like Sandy will become increasingly common in the decades to come as the Earth's mean temperature warms. Warmer temperatures generally mean more storms for some areas, the eastern seaboard being one such place.

That Earth's climate is warming is difficult to argue against, since the weather data agrees this is occurring. But climate change is also a natural process, long documented in historical and environmental records. It is a fact of life, a thing to which populations must adapt. 

It is also difficult to blame humans for the sum of the world's warming. 

Regardless, if violent storms do become more frequent, then changes will have to be made, at least in those areas that are prone to storm damage. 

For New Jersey residents, there is a silver lining to the disaster of Sandy. The destruction is an opportunity to rebuild the popular seaside communities, reinventing themselves a little along the way. Newer homes mean better property values. New businesses and attractions will attract customers and tourists from farther away. Eventually, the communities will recoup their losses. 

Unfortunately, that day is years into the future, and assumes one thing - there will not be another Sandy for a long time to come, a troubling prospect that cannot be guaranteed. 


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