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Eccentric Engineer turns passenger jet into home in the Oregon woods

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
October 15th, 2012
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Engineer Bruce Campbell was after something different when he designed his getaway home high in the Oregon forest. Perhaps adhering to a "waste not, want not" aesthetic, Campbell transformed a decommissioned Boeing 727-200 jet plane into a rustic cabin that is simultaneously low and high tech.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Sixty-two-year old Campbell bought the Boeing 727-200 for around $100,000 and took about ten years to turn it into his humble abode.

The aircraft Campbell describes as "a bird that's meant to fly" has all modern conveniences but he says his "favorite playroom" is the cockpit.

Ripping the rows of seats from the 727-200's main cabin, Campbell turned the space into a bedroom, lounge and office.

The native of Hillsboro cooks his meals in the former cabin-crew kitchen. He has also upgraded the plane's bathroom and built a shower.

He loves nothing more than to give curious visitors tours around his unusual homestead.

Entering and exiting through stairs lowered down from the plane, Campbell explains that he tries to keep his new home clean. Wiping his feet, Campbell clambers through the latch-operated door.

With the passenger chairs removed there is plenty of room for Campbell's possessions, which, stacked up in the cabin, make the plane feel homey.

Living there, he says, "exhilarates" him.

After electricity, one of the first tasks in transforming the jumbo jet into a hospitable living space was getting a working plumbing system.

Tinker with the aircraft's three toilets, they were quickly operational.

"It's small but I'm small," he told CNN of the restroom.

Campbell also installed a shower within the main cabin of the plane.

The shower offers little privacy but points out that if you live in the middle of the woods, that's not much of a pressing concern.

Describing the venture as an "experiment," Campbell hopes that others will follow his lead. "It is a good experiment in a living environment that, I hope, will prove to be something that mankind will embrace with vigor at a later time," he said.

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