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His presence was uplifting and his words were powerful. Pope Benedict won the hearts of New Yorkers during His last official act - the Papal Mass at Yankee Stadium.

Pope Benedict XVI concluded his official visit to the United States with a Mass at Yankee Stadium in New York City. He left the Nation's Catholics with a message of hope, challenging them to move forward with a renewed passion for Christ and His Church.

Pope Benedict XVI concluded his official visit to the United States with a Mass at Yankee Stadium in New York City. He left the Nation's Catholics with a message of hope, challenging them to move forward with a renewed passion for Christ and His Church.

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NEW YORK (Catholic Online) – For the third time in history a Pope visited Yankee Stadium. At 2:21 pm Pope Benedict arrived, slowly driving past the stands filled with more than 57,000 cheering people who were waving yellow and white scarves, the colors of the Vatican.

The stadium, as with the National’s facility in Washington on Thursday, had been transformed from a baseball park to a church in just a few days for this special gathering. A raised platform over the infield was built so that it wouldn’t rest on the field below. The crest of the Holy Father was placed at the pitcher’s mound with yellow and white fabrics streaming outward to the rest of the platform.

Prior to the Pope’s arrival, a continual procession of priests, deacons, and bishops entered from both dugouts and proceeded to their seats on either side of the altar. As the clergy moved in procession, they were greeted cheers and shouts of encouragement from the crowds in the stands.

Rain had been predicted for New York earlier in the week, but the sun broke through the clouds as the Holy Father walked in procession with His Cardinals toward the altar. The crowd was much more subdued, knowing this was a time of worship, yet still periodically erupted with cheers.

Edward Cardinal Egan, Archbishop of the Archdiocese of New York, officially welcomed Pope Benedict to the city. Just before he concluded his remarks in Spanish, the Cardinal said, “Please know that your visit inspires and heightens in the hearts of all of us that ‘life-changing and life-sustaining hope’ about which you wrote in your Encyclical Letter with such depth and learning. We pray for the Bishop of Rome, the Supreme Pontiff, and the Vicar of Christ; and we promise to continue that prayer throughout the years that lie ahead with ever-greater love and hope.”

Cardinal then showed a chasuble that had been presented to him by the Pope during the Mass on Saturday morning. He told the crowd, “Come to St. Patrick’s next week to Mass… I’ll look really great!”

In his homily, the Pontiff referred to the readings for the Mass and talked of two words with which our contemporary culture has great difficulty – authority and obedience. Citing that we live in an era of personal freedom, the Pope pointed to the Gospel reading as a hope of true freedom, where St. John writes that Jesus is the Way, the Truth, and the Life. He pointed to the fact that both authority and obedience are necessary for freedom.

“The Gospel teaches us that true freedom, the freedom of the children of God, is found only in the self-surrender which is part of the mystery of love,” the Pope shared. “Real freedom, then, is God's gracious gift, the fruit of conversion to his truth, the truth which makes us free.”

“Today's celebration is more than an occasion of gratitude for graces received. It is also a summons to move forward with firm resolve to use wisely the blessings of freedom, in order to build a future of hope for coming generations.”

Pope Benedict’s message focused strongly on the youth and particularly the impact they had made upon him Saturday at the rally. “Yesterday, not far from here, I was moved by the joy, the hope and the generous love of Christ which I saw on the faces of the many young people assembled in Dunwoodie. They are the Church's future, and they deserve all the prayer and support that you can give them. And so I wish to close by adding a special word of encouragement to them.”

Speaking directly to young people in the stadium, the Pope shared words of encouragement and challenge, “May you step forward and take up the responsibility which your faith in Christ sets before you! May you find the courage to proclaim Christ, "the same, yesterday, and today and for ever" and the unchanging truths which have their foundation in him.”

This was Pope Benedict’s final message in the United States, his last words to the Church’s faithful before departing for Rome later this evening. While not specifically mentioning the scandals, as he has in past messages, he built upon those previous messages and left the Catholics in our nation with a challenge.

“Dear friends, only God in his providence knows what works his grace has yet to bring forth in your lives and in the life of the Church in the United States. Yet Christ's promise fills us with sure hope. Let us now join our prayers to his, as living stones in that spiritual temple which is his one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church. Let us lift our eyes to him, for even now he is preparing for us a place in his Father's house. And empowered by his Holy Spirit, let us work with renewed zeal for the spread of his Kingdom.”

When the Pope finished his homily the crowds broke out again into cheers and shouts of love

Following the creed sung in Latin, the Prayers of the Faithful were offered in English, Italian, Polish, French, Tagalog, Croatian, and Igbo, reflecting the diversity present in the Archdiocese of New York.

In the Eucharistic Prayer, the Holy Father consecrated approximately 26,000 hosts as priests holding ciboria filled with unconsecrated wafers lined the infield. The remaining hosts were previously consecrated at a Mass earlier Sunday and held in reserve for distribution in the upper portions of the stadium.

No sooner had the deacon announce that the Mass was ended when the crowds broke into loud cheers, whistles, and shouts of “I love you, Benedict,” while waving their scarves in the air.

Truly Pope Benedict XVI hit a home run at Yankee Stadium. From the reports received of the other venues of the Pontiff’s whirlwind tour of New York and Washington, the trip was a home run as well.



The welcome message from Edward Cardinal Egan:

Most Holy Father, welcome to New York!

Your pastoral visit is for all of us gathered here this afternoon an immense blessing for which we are truly and deeply grateful.

Two hundred years ago this month, your wise and heroic predecessor of happy memory, Pope Pius VII, elevated the Diocese of Baltimore, the only Diocese in the nation at the time, to the dignity of an Archdiocese and created within its Metropolitan Province four Suffragan Sees. They were Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Bardstown, which is now Louisville.

All four have since become Archdioceses and, along with Baltimore, are engaged in Bicentennial Celebrations which, in the providence of God, culminate most fittingly with the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass offered by the Vicar of Our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, here in our midst. For your visit and your leading us in this Eucharist, Most Holy Father, we express our humble and heartfelt gratitude.

With us on this splendid and grace-filled occasion are cardinals, archbishops, bishops, priests, deacons, religious, and faithful from all 195 dioceses and archdioceses of the United States of America. They represent an extraordinary variety of races and ethnic backgrounds, all united in the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church of which you are the Supreme Shepherd.

They are joined by clergy and laity of many faiths and communions, political leaders, and men, women, and children from every corner of this land. It is an extraordinary privilege to be allowed to tell you on their behalf what a splendid and deeply appreciated grace your presence is for all of us.

Most Holy Father, we have read with pleasure and gratitude your most recent Encyclical Letter, “Saved by Hope.” It sets the theme for this Eucharist, “Christ, Our Easter Hope,” and points out most tellingly the path we need to follow with unlimited trust and confidence in the Lord over the years that lie ahead. Thank you most sincerely for that Encyclical and for all that you have said, written, and done over the past three years as Successor of Saint Peter to deepen our faith and strengthen our commitment to live as the Lord has taught us to live.

Finally, Most Holy Father, allow me to add that we in New York feel especially blessed by your coming among us in our Cathedral, at our seminary, in one of our parish churches, before the world community at the United Nations, and in Lower Manhattan at what we have come to call “Ground Zero,” a place of tragedy hallowed by your concern and prayer.

Please know that your visit inspires and heightens in the hearts of all of us that “life-changing and life-sustaining hope” about which you wrote in your Encyclical Letter with such depth and learning. We pray for the Bishop of Rome, the Supreme Pontiff, and the Vicar of Christ; and we promise to continue that prayer throughout the years that lie ahead with ever-greater love and hope.

Most Holy Father, welcome!


The Homily from Pope Benedict XVI at the Papal Mass in Yankee Stadium

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,
In the Gospel we have just heard, Jesus tells his Apostles to put their faith in him, for he is "the way, and the truth and the life" (Jn 14:6). Christ is the way that leads to the Father, the truth which gives meaning to human existence, and the source of that life which is eternal joy with all the saints in his heavenly Kingdom. Let us take the Lord at his word! Let us renew our faith in him and put all our hope in his promises!

With this encouragement to persevere in the faith of Peter (cf. Lk 22:32; Mt 16:17), I greet all of you with great affection. I thank Cardinal Egan for his cordial words of welcome in your name. At this Mass, the Church in the United States celebrates the two hundredth anniversary of the creation of the Sees of New York, Boston, Philadelphia and Louisville from the mother See of Baltimore. The presence around this altar of the Successor of Peter, his brother bishops and priests, and deacons, men and women religious, and lay faithful from throughout the fifty states of the Union, eloquently manifests our communion in the Catholic faith which comes to us from the Apostles.

Our celebration today is also a sign of the impressive growth which God has given to the Church in your country in the past two hundred years. From a small flock like that described in the first reading, the Church in America has been built up in fidelity to the twin commandment of love of God and love of neighbor. In this land of freedom and opportunity, the Church has united a widely diverse flock in the profession of the faith and, through her many educational, charitable and social works, has also contributed significantly to the growth of American society as a whole.

This great accomplishment was not without its challenges. Today's first reading, taken from the Acts of the Apostles, speaks of linguistic and cultural tensions already present within the earliest Church community. At the same time, it shows the power of the word of God, authoritatively proclaimed by the Apostles and received in faith, to create a unity which transcends the divisions arising from human limitations and weakness. Here we are reminded of a fundamental truth: that the Church's unity has no other basis than the Word of God, made flesh in Christ Jesus our Lord. All external signs of identity, all structures, associations and programs, valuable or even essential as they may be, ultimately exist only to support and foster the deeper unity which, in Christ, is God's indefectible gift to his Church.

The first reading also makes clear, as we see from the imposition of hands on the first deacons, that the Church's unity is "apostolic". It is a visible unity, grounded in the Apostles whom Christ chose and appointed as witnesses to his resurrection, and it is born of what the Scriptures call "the obedience of faith" (Rom 1:5; cf. Acts 6:7).

"Authority" … "obedience". To be frank, these are not easy words to speak nowadays. Words like these represent a "stumbling stone" for many of our contemporaries, especially in a society which rightly places a high value on personal freedom. Yet, in the light of our faith in Jesus Christ - "the way and the truth and the life" - we come to see the fullest meaning, value, and indeed beauty, of those words.

The Gospel teaches us that true freedom, the freedom of the children of God, is found only in the self-surrender which is part of the mystery of love. Only by losing ourselves, the Lord tells us, do we truly find ourselves (cf. Lk 17:33). True freedom blossoms when we turn away from the burden of sin, which clouds our perceptions and weakens our resolve, and find the source of our ultimate happiness in him who is infinite love, infinite freedom, infinite life. "In his will is our peace".

Real freedom, then, is God's gracious gift, the fruit of conversion to his truth, the truth which makes us free (cf. Jn 8:32). And this freedom in truth brings in its wake a new and liberating way of seeing reality. When we put on "the mind of Christ" (cf. Phil 2:5), new horizons open before us! In the light of faith, within the communion of the Church, we also find the inspiration and strength to become a leaven of the Gospel in the world. We become the light of the world, the salt of the earth (cf. Mt 5:13-14), entrusted with the "apostolate" of making our own lives, and the world in which we live, conform ever more fully to God's saving plan.

This magnificent vision of a world being transformed by the liberating truth of the Gospel is reflected in the description of the Church found in today's second reading. The Apostle tells us that Christ, risen from the dead, is the keystone of a great temple which is even now rising in the Spirit. And we, the members of his body, through Baptism have become "living stones" in that temple, sharing in the life of God by grace, blessed with the freedom of the sons of God, and empowered to offer spiritual sacrifices pleasing to him (cf. 1 Pet 2:5).

And what is this offering which we are called to make, if not to direct our every thought, word and action to the truth of the Gospel and to harness all our energies in the service of God's Kingdom? Only in this way can we build with God, on the one foundation which is Christ (cf. 1 Cor 3:11). Only in this way can we build something that will truly endure. Only in this way can our lives find ultimate meaning and bear lasting fruit.

Today we recall the bicentennial of a watershed in the history of the Church in the United States: its first great chapter of growth. In these two hundred years, the face of the Catholic community in your country has changed greatly. We think of the successive waves of immigrants whose traditions have so enriched the Church in America. We think of the strong faith which built up the network of churches, educational, healthcare and social institutions which have long been the hallmark of the Church in this land.

We think also of those countless fathers and mothers who passed on the faith to their children, the steady ministry of the many priests who devoted their lives to the care of souls, and the incalculable contribution made by so many men and women religious, who not only taught generations of children how to read and write, but also inspired in them a lifelong desire to know God, to love him and to serve him.

How many "spiritual sacrifices pleasing to God" have been offered up in these two centuries! In this land of religious liberty, Catholics found freedom not only to practice their faith, but also to participate fully in civic life, bringing their deepest moral convictions to the public square and cooperating with their neighbors in shaping a vibrant, democratic society. Today's celebration is more than an occasion of gratitude for graces received. It is also a summons to move forward with firm resolve to use wisely the blessings of freedom, in order to build a future of hope for coming generations.

"You are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people he claims for his own, to proclaim his glorious works" (1 Pet 2:9). These words of the Apostle Peter do not simply remind us of the dignity which is ours by God's grace; they also challenge us to an ever greater fidelity to the glorious inheritance which we have received in Christ (cf. Eph 1:18). They challenge us to examine our consciences, to purify our hearts, to renew our baptismal commitment to reject Satan and all his empty promises. They challenge us to be a people of joy, heralds of the unfailing hope (cf. Rom 5:5) born of faith in God's word, and trust in his promises.

Each day, throughout this land, you and so many of your neighbors pray to the Father in the Lord's own words: "Thy Kingdom come". This prayer needs to shape the mind and heart of every Christian in this nation. It needs to bear fruit in the way you lead your lives and in the way you build up your families and your communities. It needs to create new "settings of hope" (cf. Spe Salvi, 32ff.) where God's Kingdom becomes present in all its saving power.

Praying fervently for the coming of the Kingdom also means being constantly alert for the signs of its presence, and working for its growth in every sector of society. It means facing the challenges of present and future with confidence in Christ's victory and a commitment to extending his reign. It means not losing heart in the face of resistance, adversity and scandal. It means overcoming every separation between faith and life, and countering false gospels of freedom and happiness.

It also means rejecting a false dichotomy between faith and political life, since, as the Second Vatican Council put it, "there is no human activity - even in secular affairs - which can be withdrawn from God's dominion" (Lumen Gentium, 36). It means working to enrich American society and culture with the beauty and truth of the Gospel, and never losing sight of that great hope which gives meaning and value to all the other hopes which inspire our lives.

And this, dear friends, is the particular challenge which the Successor of Saint Peter sets before you today. As "a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation", follow faithfully in the footsteps of those who have gone before you! Hasten the coming of God's Kingdom in this land! Past generations have left you an impressive legacy. In our day too, the Catholic community in this nation has been outstanding in its prophetic witness in the defense of life, in the education of the young, in care for the poor, the sick and the stranger in your midst. On these solid foundations, the future of the Church in America must even now begin to rise!

Yesterday, not far from here, I was moved by the joy, the hope and the generous love of Christ which I saw on the faces of the many young people assembled in Dunwoodie. They are the Church's future, and they deserve all the prayer and support that you can give them. And so I wish to close by adding a special word of encouragement to them.

My dear young friends, like the seven men, "filled with the Spirit and wisdom" whom the Apostles charged with care for the young Church, may you step forward and take up the responsibility which your faith in Christ sets before you! May you find the courage to proclaim Christ, "the same, yesterday, and today and for ever" and the unchanging truths which have their foundation in him (cf. Gaudium et Spes, 10; Heb 13:8).

These are the truths that set us free! They are the truths which alone can guarantee respect for the inalienable dignity and rights of each man, woman and child in our world - including the most defenseless of all human beings, the unborn child in the mother's womb. In a world where, as Pope John Paul II, speaking in this very place, reminded us, Lazarus continues to stand at our door (Homily at Yankee Stadium, October 2, 1979, No. 7), let your faith and love bear rich fruit in outreach to the poor, the needy and those without a voice.

Young men and women of America, I urge you: open your hearts to the Lord's call to follow him in the priesthood and the religious life. Can there be any greater mark of love than this: to follow in the footsteps of Christ, who was willing to lay down his life for his friends (cf. Jn 15:13)?

In today's Gospel, the Lord promises his disciples that they will perform works even greater than his (cf. Jn 14:12). Dear friends, only God in his providence knows what works his grace has yet to bring forth in your lives and in the life of the Church in the United States. Yet Christ's promise fills us with sure hope. Let us now join our prayers to his, as living stones in that spiritual temple which is his one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church. Let us lift our eyes to him, for even now he is preparing for us a place in his Father's house. And empowered by his Holy Spirit, let us work with renewed zeal for the spread of his Kingdom.

"Happy are you who believe!" (cf. 1 Pet 2:7). Let us turn to Jesus! He alone is the way that leads to eternal happiness, the truth who satisfies the deepest longings of every heart, and the life who brings ever new joy and hope, to us and to our world. Amen.

* *

Queridos hermanos y hermanas en el Señor:
Les saludo con afecto y me alegro de celebrar esta Santa Misa para dar gracias a Dios por el bicentenario del momento en que empezó a desarrollarse la Iglesia Católica en esta Nación. Al mirar el camino de fe recorrido en estos años, no exento también de dificultades, alabamos al Señor por los frutos que la Palabra de Dios ha dado en estas tierras y le manifestamos nuestro deseo de que Cristo, Camino, Verdad y Vida, sea cada vez más conocido y amado.

Aquí, en este País de libertad, quiero proclamar con fuerza que la Palabra de Cristo no elimina nuestras aspiraciones a una vida plena y libre, sino que nos descubre nuestra verdadera dignidad de hijos de Dios y nos alienta a luchar contra todo aquello que nos esclaviza, empezando por nuestro propio egoísmo y caprichos. Al mismo tiempo, nos anima a manifestar nuestra fe a través de nuestra vida de caridad y a hacer que nuestras comunidades eclesiales sean cada día más acogedoras y fraternas.

Sobre todo a los jóvenes les confío asumir el gran reto que entraña creer en Cristo y lograr que esa fe se manifieste en una cercanía efectiva hacia los pobres. También en una respuesta generosa a las llamadas que Él sigue formulando para dejarlo todo y emprender una vida de total consagración a Dios y a la Iglesia, en la vida sacerdotal o religiosa.

Queridos hermanos y hermanas, les invito a mirar el futuro con esperanza, permitiendo que Jesús entre en sus vidas. Solamente Él es el camino que conduce a la felicidad que no acaba, la verdad que satisface las más nobles expectativas humanas y la vida colmada de gozo para bien de la Iglesia y el mundo. Que Dios les bendiga.

---


Pope Francis: end world hunger through 'Prayer and Action'


© 2014 - Distributed by THE NEWS CONSORTIUM

Pope Francis Prayer Intentions for April 2014
Ecology and Justice:
That governments may foster the protection of creation and the just distribution of natural resources.
Hope for the Sick: That the Risen Lord may fill with hope the hearts of those who are being tested by pain and sickness.

Keywords:



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