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Mayor Bloomberg: Let Them Suffer? The Perils of Secularist Humanism Comments

". . . so you didn't get enough painkillers and you did have to suffer a little bit. . . ," Mayor Bloomberg said in response to criticism of his initiative to limit the use of painkillers at public hospitals.What arrogance! I find it hard to imagine that Bloomberg knows more than doctors about when and how much pain medication is appropriate to prescribe to their patients. Continue Reading

1 - 10 of 16 Comments

  1. judy claar
    1 year ago

    A great article on secular humanism v. Christian humanism. Secular humanism lacks caring and compassion; whereas Christian humanism INCLUDES compassion and caring and More.

    When Obama or Bloomberg do not subject themselves to Social Security or Obamacare, what does that tell you?
    Yes. It is a matter of equal quality care, NOT being equal. It is a matter-of-fact, that when they reach Social Security age, they will NOT be like the Majority of Americans who must decline their normal insurance and automatically go on Social Security and buy supplemental insurance because Social Security does not foot the bill. I foresee rising costs in supplemental insurances as SS will no longer be able to pay what it did. Thank you very much Obama! And those of like minds.

    History is repeating itself. When my children were young, America was the #1 Super Power in the world. It is sinking fast. I predict, that within the next ten years or so, China will be #1. We were also #1 leading in education. Now, we are #26! My point in saying this, is, that you ARE living history. I HAVE LIVED and WATCHED it. I was Democrat. Then Republican. Now Independent. Is a party really The Grand Ole Party Anymore? True Catholics anymore?

    @Robert Burford, Yes, what you say is quite true. We need to find a way to deal with abusers, period. They present issues that are multi-faceted into society itself. And our country politic sees no other way of dealing with them on this "one" issue, other than to make the truly suffering pay for it! Boy, that was a Great idea!
    So yes, this side of the coin needs to be addressed, BUT not at the expense of others. We have had opportunities since the 60s to deal with this problem, and politics have NOT provided a sufficient answer. And now, our Great Leader and Bloomberg are telling us this "cut back" reduction in spending is the answer?? Smart more Intelligent persons than I, cannot use their medical Intelligence to come up with a Solution to the problem??? OBAMA and Bloomberg DO NOT have medical degrees! And even if they had doctors agreeing with them, I would not trust them. Sorry, but I have read, watched ,and participated in history too much. And history does not lie.

    @Vance and Rob, Truer words were never spoken. Blessings to all...

  2. Rob
    1 year ago

    vance, this is one time I have to agree with you 100%. It's crazy how these guys in the senate and the house can serve for decades as the country goes deeper and deeper in the hole.

    We have no sense when it comes to these guys. They become wealthy men and women and our expense. They have created partisianship and have used it as a tool to perpetuate a sort of royalty in DC. And we just send them back term after term.

  3. vance
    1 year ago

    Isn't it amazing that New Yorkers actually voted for this guy. But yet again they continue to vote for Charles Rangel who must be the most corrupt politician in America along side Obama, Reid, and Pelosi. New Yorkers must love corrupt politicians. Gov Cuomo anyone?

  4. Denise M. Sharar
    1 year ago

    I THINK A BETTER IDEA IS TO MOVE BEYOND POLITICIANS, TAKE BACK OUR LAND, AND MAKE OUR OWN SPIRITUAL DECISIONS. WE ARE ALL TIRED OF LISTENING TO B.S.,PAYING TAXES, AND BEING TOLD HOW TO LIVE OUR LIVES. LET'S ALL MOVE ON AND END GOVERNMENT. WE CAN DO THIS BY BECOMING AMISH AND ANY OTHER SPIRITUAL FORCE THAT CAN END CORRUPTION, EVIL CHURCHES, ETC.

  5. Stephanie
    1 year ago

    I think people should be allowed to have as much pain medication as they need, especially those who are terminally ill.

  6. Emma
    1 year ago

    Yes. Let's talk for a minute about addicts that show up in public hospital emergency rooms. Why is that? It's because there is a very slim window of opportunity between when an addict will seek and participate in treatment. When treatment facilitaties have a more than 30 day waiting period, that person is lost. Who has the highest rate of addiction to prescription pain medication? Those who have the easiest access to it, those in the medical and nursing professions. Why don't people seek treatment? Because they're afraid of being branded as repeat offenders, of losing jobs and children. Most street addicts know where to get their drugs and don't rely on hospitals amf most prefer nonprescription drugs. The wealthy have easy access to their "medicine " and clinics such as the Betty Ford Clinic as a treatment option. We spend excessive amounts on a "war on drugs " while at the same time we close mental health and treatment facilities! We are a nation obsessed with war! Call it a war and everybody jumps on board! Once again the poor become the scapegoats for our societal ills and the loss of Christian Compassion! Jesus had no problem dining with sinners! Going to be such a loss if our Catholic Charities are forced to close down as they seem to be about the only place left where the prostitutes and lepers can go without being judged!!!!!

  7. John Mainhart
    1 year ago

    The problem is somewhere else. Care for the sick should be personal and individualistic. You could make a decision to give pain relief or not if your reasons are pure and in the best interest of the patient. Our problem is our love of money. Since we think money solves all problems like our President and the Mayor, we beginj to look at the systems we have created and think we can organize the system so it ill be less expensive thereby losing sight of the individual in the process. Successful elitist, people, no matter what they call themselves, are always in danger of forgetting about the individual.
    I fail to see how anyone can see our President as compassionate when he spends so much time helping women to kill the unborn. I personally believe he does this to limit population growth so he is already deciding which people have the right to live If my guress is right he will do ,more of it by denying elderly and the sick on the basis of some general policies that he thinks will cut costs and make the system more efficient.
    All these leaders can suggest some ways to change things in a persuasive way if they let the decision up to the caregiver. We must become much more local in our approach to solving problems because the closer you get to the person in need the better chance we have of loving them. A plethora of laws does nothing but make the systems more rigid and unforgiving and prompts the people assigned with the care to focus more on giving and getting money rather than care...

  8. Robert Burford
    1 year ago

    I understand where Mayor Bloomberg is coming from. My daughter works as a nurse at a local hospital. The new year started and all the "repeat offenders" have showed up looking for prescription drugs. They are not as sick as the mother in the story but are looking for easy fixes. Not sure what the answer is but these repeat offenders are milking our healthcare.

  9. Michael Terheyden
    1 year ago

    Daniel Strain, thank you for your comment. As a Catholic, I too see myself as a humanist; and I will proudly stand with anyone who seriously desires truth, goodness, beauty, unity, and love of neighbor.

    My understanding of secular humanism has been influenced by people like Pope Benedict, Blessed John Paul II, the theologian Germain Grisez, and many others. In February of 2012, I wrote and article titled "In the Face of Secularism, It is Time for a New Defense of Christianity" (http://www.catholic.org/clife/lent/story.php?id=44923). It may help you better understand why I associate Bloomberg's restrictions on pain medication with secular humanism. God bless you.

  10. JayKay
    1 year ago

    Between these two men, two distinctly different comments were made on two distinctly different topics. Bloomberg's comments appear to be the most alarming: He should be asked; if a dog were hospitalized and in pain with the 'normal' amount of pain intervention, should the dog be given more of this analgesic narcotic for relief? Who could say"no"?

    The comment Bloomberg makes is driven by other outside interests, not pertaining to ethical standards elected officials have obligations to hold and should be booted out of office. We are talking about practical ethical medical care, which should not hold any boundaries for insurance plans, income or otherwise. Many factors play in to a persons comfort level and pain tolerance. Long term pain care results in tolerances to medications. A 90 pound little old lady will react different to these medications than a 240 pound man. Other factors will result in differing levels of pain relief from the same amount of any medication.

    The ethics in this matter should be given top priority, not budgets or political gains in the public's mood or modern movements spoke of during elevator rides on the jobs of those fortunate enough to have jobs. As an Advocate for proper pain management, I have found that the biggest problem within the system is under-treating patients. Virtually every doctor will error on the under-diagnose side of treatment, often leaving patients unable to take care of their business or daily routine, losing mobility and effectiveness on the job or at home. To these individuals, it's a matter of getting proper care of having a life. The system is built to make money, and the only method patients have to obtain proper treatment is to pay into it.

    This may sound foolish, but maybe the drug cartels should benefit on this matter. They could open their own clinics up, and give those who suffer the proper dosage needed for their specific concerns. The culture we have developed into makes this proposal not too far off. When speaking to medical doctors on the subject of "drug dealers", they all agree, saying, "we're in the same business". The war on drugs has been lost, never to ever be fought with any significant victory again. Dollars can buy what you want, and the dollars are in their hands.

    So now we have politicians making remedies of our social programs set up to give equal care to every citizen babbling nonsensical solutions such as kill the less wealthy and let them suffer on the way there? I do not believe President Obama is in that category; I believe the opposite of him. Bloomberg on the other hand needs to rethink his comments and/or the things that drive his thinking as well as political acts.


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