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Lent / Easter News

St. Augustine: A Samaritan Woman Came to Draw Water

By • Catholic Online • 3/23/2014

Jesus answered her and said: If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, “Give me a drink,” perhaps you might have asked him and he would have given you living water. CHESAPEAKE, Va. (Catholic Online) - On this Third Sunday of Lent, many parishes in the Church throughout the ...


A Barren Heart: God is in the Desert

By • Catholic Online • 3/18/2014

Something deep within is calling me to trust in the goodness of this dry season.  If God has chosen this desert for me for now, I will follow Him into it.  In the desert there are no distractions, nothing to please my eye and tempt me to look elsewhere. Lazy flesh is being asked to ...


Why We Proclaim the Transfiguration of the Lord on the Second Sunday of Lent

By • Catholic Online • 3/15/2014

As we reflect on the Transfiguration of Jesus on this Second Sunday of Lent, let us enter more deeply into the mystery it opens by choosing to live differently. Let us draw encouragement from the account of the Transfiguration of Jesus Christ. Let us respond to the invitations of grace in ...


God bless you Cardinal George, and thank you for showing us how to live and love, with, in and for Lord Jesus. May we all take stock of our lives this Lent.

Courageous Cardinal George Challenges Us to Use Lent as a Time to Take Stock of Our Lives

By • Catholic Online • 3/11/2014

Lent 2014 brings the death and resurrection of the Lord more insistently into the horizon of our lives. Before the Lord, we are all weak and needy, poor in who we are, rich in him. Grateful for our various callings and rejoicing in that poverty that opens us to God's grace, let us observe ...


Francis hugs the poor

When Did We See You Hungry? Lent and the Love of Preference for the Poor

By • Catholic Online • 3/11/2014

The option or love of preference for the poor. This is an option or a special form of primacy in the exercise of Christian charity to which the whole tradition of the church bears witness. It affects the life of each Christian inasmuch as he or she seeks to imitate the life of Christ, but ...


Jesus does battle with the Devil

Led by the Spirit into the Desert: God Does Not Need Lent, We Do

By • Catholic Online • 3/10/2014

This ancient practice of setting aside 40 days in order to enter - in Jesus - into the desert places in our own daily lives and confront the temptations and struggles we face - is a gift. It comes from the Lord and is offered through the Church who is our mother. The Church as mother and ...


This Lent we must follow what the Bible tells us to do...Give...Pray...Fast...

Almsgiving, Prayer, and Fasting: The Three Pillars of Lent

By • Catholic Online • 3/8/2014

'Give alms...Pray to your Father...Fast without a gloomy face...' (Matthew 6:1-18) LOS ANGELES, CA - Giving alms, Jesus teaches, means making the needs of others our own, especially the needy of our world. They are all around us: children and the old, the sick and the suffering, families and ...


All Christians are called to prayer. Only prayer can satisfy the hunger of our souls. It also changes us as we enter into the cloister of our own hearts. It strips away only what impedes love. Those who pray can then become lanterns of love for others seeking the way through the darkness of their own lives.  Lent is a time to learn to pray, to love, and to live our Lives more fully in Communion with God.

Contemplatives in the World: Learning to Pray During the Forty Days of Lent

By • Catholic Online • 3/8/2014

The prayer of Jesus opened the heavens, brought provision to the hungry, gave Him clarity for making decisions and brought the glory of heaven to earth and earth to heaven. Prayer still does all of this, and more, for all who will learn how to live their lives immersed in God as He did. ...


Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us rid ourselves of every burden and sin that clings to us and persevere in running the race that lies before us while keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus, the leader and perfecter of faith.

For the sake of the joy that lay before him he endured the cross, despising its shame, and has taken his seat at the right of the throne of God. Consider how he endured such opposition from sinners, in order that you may not grow weary and lose heart.'

In your struggle against sin you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding blood. You have also forgotten the exhortation addressed to you as sons: 'My son, do not disdain the discipline of the Lord or lose heart when reproved by him; for whom the Lord loves, he disciplines; he scourges every son he acknowledges. (Hebrews 12: 1-6)

Ash Wednesday: Turn Away From Sin and Turn Toward the Lord

By • Catholic Online • 3/6/2014

Every Lent is also a reminder to us of our own mortality. "Remember you are dust and to dust you will return" is a time for us to pause and reflect. In an age drunk on self worship, a reminder of the brevity of our days should draw us to our knees. From that posture of prayer and penitence we ...


We fast during Lent, but every Friday in the year is also a day of fasting. Why keep Friday as a fast day? Through this self denial we identify with the death of the Lord. However, there are some other good reasons for keeping Friday as a fast day. We function best when we are observing a regular routine. We keep Sundays special through the celebration of Mass, and making it a special day of relaxation.

Fr Dwight Longenecker on the Practical Practice of Fasting

By • Catholic Online • 3/5/2014

Put very simply--Jesus commands us to fast and pray. The saints take fasting seriously and the church commands us to make fasting part of our life. Why not take up this discipline with a new intention. The amazing thing you will discover is not only does it help you physically, mentally and ...





More Easter / Lent

'So it is written that the Christ would suffer and on the third day rise from the dead' - Luke 24:46

Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of the Season of Lent. It is a season of penance, reflection, and fasting which prepares us for Christ's Resurrection on Easter Sunday, through which we attain redemption. continue reading


Palm Sunday

Palm Sunday, the Sunday before Easter, commemorates Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem, an event mentioned in all four canonical Gospels. (Mark 11:1.11, Matthew 21:1.11, Luke 19:28.44, and John 12:12.19) ... continue reading


Holy Week

On Palm Sunday, we celebrate the first joy of the season, as we celebrate Our Lord's triumphant entrance into Jerusalem where he was welcomed by crowds worshiping him and laying down palm leaves before him. It also marks the beginning of Holy Week... continue reading


Holy Thursday

HOLY THURSDAY is the most complex and profound of all religious observances. It celebrates his last supper with the disciples, a celebration of Passover ... continue reading


Good Friday

On Good Friday, each member of the Church tries to understand at what cost Christ has won our redemption. In the solemn ceremonies of Holy Week we unite ourselves to our Savior, and we contemplate our own death to sin in the Death of our Lord ... continue reading


Easter Sunday

Easter is the principal feast of the ecclesiastical year. Leo I (Sermo xlvii in Exodum) calls it the greatest feast (festum festorum), and says that Christmas is celebrated only in preparation for Easter. It is the centre of the greater part of the ecclesiastical year ... continue reading


Fasting and Abstinence

For most people the easiest practice to consistently fulfill will be the traditional one, to abstain from meat on all Fridays of the year. During Lent abstinence from meat on Fridays is obligatory in the United States as elsewhere. Christ Himself said that His disciples would fast once He had departed (Lk. 5:35). continue reading


FAQs About Lent

Everything answered from when does lent end, ashes, giving something up, stations of the cross and blessed palms. The key to understanding the meaning of Lent is simple: Baptism... continue reading


Stations of the Cross

Stations of the Cross refers to the depiction of the final hours (or Passion) of Jesus, and the devotion commemorating the Passion. First Station: Jesus is condemned to death... pray the stations now


What did you give up for Lent?

What did you give up for Lent?

From the humorous to the bizarre, people have had interesting Lenten experiences. Tell us about what you are going to give up for this Lenten Year.
What others gave up »

Lent / Easter News

Good Friday

  • Good Friday

    On Good Friday, the entire Church fixes her gaze on the Cross at Calvary. Each member of the Church tries to understand at what cost Christ has won our redemption.

    The Cross

    In the symbol of the Cross we can see the magnitude of the human tragedy, the ravages of original sin, and the infinite love of God. Learn More

Ash Wednesday

  • Ash Wednesday

    Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of the Season of Lent. It is a season of penance, reflection, and fasting which prepares us for Christ's Resurrection on Easter Sunday, through which we attain redemption.

    The Ashes

    The ashes are made from the blessed palms used in the Palm Sunday celebration of the previous year. The ashes are christened with Holy Water and are scented by exposure to incense. Learn More

Stations of the Cross

  • Stations of the Cross

    Stations of the Cross refers to the depiction of the final hours (or Passion) of Jesus, and the devotion commemorating the Passion.

    Opening Prayer

    ACT OF CONTRITION. O my God, my Redeemer, behold me here at Thy feet. From the bottom of my heart... Pray the Stations

Fasting & Abstinence

  • 'Christ Himself said that His disciples would fast once He had departed' Lk. 5:35

    Abstinence. The law of abstinence requires a Catholic 14 years of age until death to abstain from eating meat on Fridays in honor of the Passion of Jesus on Good Friday. Salt and freshwater species of fish, amphibians, reptiles and shellfish are permitted.

    Fasting. The law of fasting requires a Catholic from the 18th Birthday (Canon 97) to the 59th Birthday (i.e. the beginning of the 60th year, a year which will be completed on the 60th birthday) to reduce the amount of food eaten from normal. The Church defines this as one meal a day, and two smaller meals which if added together would not exceed the main meal.
    Learn More »

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